Free African Americans
With Westmoreland Roots

 

Elisa Kelly ‘of Westmoreland county’ 1810 head of household of 4 ‘other free blacks’.

William Kayton, born abt. 1716, a “Mulatto Man’ presented by the court May 26, 1741 for cohabiting with a woman named Sarah Heath and having several children by her.  He was probably the brother of Bridget Keyton who was presented two months later to the court on July 29, for cohabiting with Aaron Rose and having several children.  [Orders 1739 – 43, 99a, 114a].

John Lawrence, a "free Mulatto" overseer living on Ronand's land in Westmoreland County in 1801

[Virginia Genealogist 31:40].

Elizabeth Lucus, born about 1717, the servant of John Footman, confessed to the Westmoreland County, court on 30 March 1736 that she had an illegitimate "Mulatto” child.  The court ordered that she pay fifteen pounds after completing her indenture or be sold by the churchwardens of Cople Parish for five years [Orders 1731 – 9, 189a, 192a].  She and her children were listed in the inventory of John Footman's Westmoreland County estate, which was taken on 21 March 1739/40:

1 Negro man named Sambo                                                                   26 pounds
1 Negro Boy named Anthony                                                                   10 pounds
1 white servant woman that has four years & a half to serve                     9 pounds
1 Mulatto Boy named Nathaniel Lucas                                                      25 pounds
1 Mulatto Boy named John Lucas                                                            12 pounds
J Mulatto Boy named Leonard Lucas                                                        10 pounds
1 Mulatto Boy named Abraham Lucas                                                      5 pounds

[Estate Settlements, Records, Inventories 1723 – 46, 2211.

On 28 May 1745, she was presented by the court for "entertaining Negroes & Servants & keeping a disorderly house" [Orders 1743 – 7. 76, 178a].  She was the ancestor of Senr. __________ of this County to serve till the age of thirty-one years.  [Register of Free Persons 1785 – 1799, no. 12].

Charles Lucas, born about 1780, registered in King George County on 9 October 1800: a dark molatto man, aged about twenty years, & about five feet five inches high, was born in this County of a free malatto woman (Register of Free Persons 1785 – 1799, no. 14].  He was head of a Spotsylvania County household of five "other free" in 1810 [VA; U2b].

Harriet Lucas, born about 1796, registered in King George County in March 1820; a dark mulatto woman, about 24 years of age, about 5 feet high, stout made, born in this County of free Parents [Register of Free Persons, 1785 – 99, no. 57].

Barbary Lucas, born about 1780, a "Molatto" farmer living with children Rubin and George Locus on Thomas Sanford's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:41].  She was head of a Westmoreland County household of five "other free" in 1810 [VA: 777].

Agatha Lucas, born about 1770, married Newman Harrison, 15 April 1791 Westmoreland County bond.  He was called Newman Hamilton in 1801 when he was counted with his wife Aggy in a List of "Free Mulattoes & Negroes in Westmoreland County" [Virginia Genealogist 31:42].

John Lucas, perhaps the one who served as a seaman in the Revolution from King George County.  [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 40].  He was taxable in Westmoreland County from 1794 to 1803 [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frames 409, 425, 501, 587] and a "Molatto" farmer living with Margaret Locus and children Penny, Margaret, and Joyce Locus on D. McCarty's land in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:41, 42].  Margaret Lucas, was taxable on a horse in the upper district from 1804 to 1807 [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frames 606, 666] and head of a Westmoreland County household of six "other free" in 1810 [VA: 777].

Elizabeth Lucas, born about 1772, married Allen Ashton, 24 December 1793 Westmoreland County bond.

Elizabeth Lucas, born about 1773, married Thomas Sorrell, 3 December 1794 Westmoreland County bond.

Spencer Lucas, born about 1780, taxable in Westmoreland County from 1801 to 1815 [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frames 551, 635, 784, 8351, a "Molatto" working as a distiller for Daniel McCarty in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:42].

Philip Lucas, taxable in King George County from 1794 to 1813, listed as a "Mulatto" in 1813 [PPTL, 1782 – 1830, frames 127, 169, 178, 203, 218. 230, 240, 279, 305, 330, 341], head of a King George County household of two "other free" in 1810 [VA: 206].

David Lucas, head of a King George County household of four "other free" in 1810 [VA: 206].

Jane Lucas, born about 1780, registered in King George County on 7 September 1820: daughter of ___ Lucas, a dark mulatto about 40 years of age, 5' 1 inch high.  Born free in this County [Register of Free

Persons 1785 – 1799, no. 63].

Natl Lucust (Lucas) listed with wife Jenney in Stafford County in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List], head of a Stafford County household of four "other free" in 1810 [VA: 128].

John Lucas, listed with wife Mary in Stafford County in 1813 [Waldrep, 1813 Tax List], head of a Stafford County household of three "other free" in 1810 [VA: 126].

Hannah Lucas, born about 1788, married Samuel Tate.  30 December 1809 Westmoreland County bond, Lawrence Ashton security.

James Little, head of a Westmoreland county household of one ‘other free”.

James McCoy, born about 1750, was taxable in the lower district of Westmoreland County from 1782 to 1815; taxable on two tithes in 1787 and 1788; three from 1789 to 1792.  Charged with John, George and Garard McKie's tithes from 1793 to 1796; called McGuy from 1782 to 1793, McKey from 1794 to 1815 and McKoy in the 1810 census [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frames 247. 269, 318, 327, 347, 358, 381, 410, 434, 450, 461, 476, 492].  He was listed as a "free Molatto" fanner living on his own land in Westmoreland County with (his wife?)  Polley McKey and child James McKey in 1801 ["A List of Free Mulattoes & Negroes in Westmoreland County" Virginia Genealogist, 31:40].  He was head of a Westmoreland County household of four "other free" in 1810 [VA: 778].  He received a pension for his service as a soldier in the Revolution [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 40].  His children were most likely:

Catherine McCoy, born about 1770, called Catherine McGuy when she married Henry Thompson, 29 September 1789 Westmoreland County bond, Bennett McGuy security.  She may have been the Kitty Thompson who was a "Molatto" living alone in Westmoreland County in 1801, a farmer on James Cox's land [Virginia Genealogist 31:46].

Rodham McCoy, born about 1770.

George McCoy, born about 1772, married Nancy McCoy, 4 January 1808 Westmoreland County bond, William Brown security.  He was head of a Westmoreland County household of five "other free" in 1810 [VA: 780].

Gerard / Jerrard McCoy, born about 1774, married Winney Davis, 27 March 1801, with the consent of Winney Davis dated the same day.  He and Winney were "Molattoes" farming Mrs. Cox's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:40], and he was head of a Westmoreland County household of five "other free" in 1810 [VA: 780].

John McCoy, born about 1778, a "Molatto" farmer living with (his wile?)  Margaret McKey on Nathaniel Oldham's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:40].

James McCoy, listed in James McKoy's household in 1801.

Bennett McCoy, born about 1757, was drafted into the service from Westmoreland County to serve in 1777.  He was allowed a pension in 1818 [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 40].  He was taxable in Westmoreland County from 1789 to 1815: taxable on a slave in 1800 and 1801, in the 'list of Free Negroes & Muiattoes" in 1813.  Called McGuy from 1789 to 1793, McKey from 1794 to 1815, and McKoy in the 1810 census [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frames 347, 358, 399, 434, 476, 512, 542, 657, 771, and 821].  In 1801, he was listed as a "free Molatlo" farmer with Hannah McKey and child Nancy McKey, living on their own land [Virginia Genealogist 31:40].  He was head of a Westmoreland County household of four "other free" in 1810 [VA: 780].  His child was:

Nancy McCoy married George McCoy, 4 January 1808 Westmoreland County bond, William Brown security.

George McCoy, born about 1759, married Elizabeth Nickens, twenty-four year-old daughter of Nathaniel Nickings, 10 March 1788 Orange County, Virginia bond, 11 March marriage by Rev. George Eve.  He was head of a Rockingham County household of three "other free'' in 1810 [VA: 130b].  According to his Revolutionary pension tile, he died in the poorhouse in Rockingham County in 1821 [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 40].  He was probably the father of:

John McCoy, born 26 January 1788 of free parents in Augusta County, Virginia, registered as a "free Negro" in Rockingham County on 17 October 1815 and recorded his "free papers” in Ross County, Ohio: a black man, aged 28 years the 26 January 1816, 6 ft Ύ in., straight and well made, was born free [Turpin, Register of Black, Mulatto, arid Poor Persons, 22; Rockingham County Register of Free Negroes. no. 24, p. 10].

Hannah McCoy, born about 1790, registered as a free Negro in Rockingham County on 11 July 1811: about 5 feet 8 Inches high, about 21 years of age, a Dark Mulatto [Register, no. 8, p. 5].

George McCoy, born 1 June 1794, registered in Rockingham County on 20 June 1815: about 21 years the first of this Month.  Bound an apprentice by order of the County Court of Rockingham to Joshua Peters also a free man of Colour to team the trade of a Sadler, about 5 feet 7 inches high a dark Mulatto [Register, no. 22, p. 10].

Verlinda McCoy McKee, born about 1763, was called a "mulatto woman" who had once been indentured to James Gwatkin on 5 August 1805 when her daughter registered as a free Negro in Prince William County [Orders 1804 – 6, 205].

Rodham McCoy, born about 1772, married Mary Asians, 23 December 1793 Westmoreland County bond, John Kirk security.  He and his wife Molly McKey and children were listed as “Free Molatloes" fanning William Ball's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:40].  He was head of a Westmoreland County household of eight "other free" in 1810 [VA: 778].  He married, second, Elizabeth Brinn, 28 December 1816 Westmoreland County bond, William King security.  His children listed with him in 1801 were:

Bob McCoy.
Fanny McCoy.

Betsey McCoy married Jarrat Thompson, 21 May 1822 Westmoreland County bond.  Gerard Thompson was living in the household of (his parents?)  John and Haney Thompson in the list of "free Molattoes" in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:45].

Thomas Mahorney, born about 1733.  Living with Sarah Weedon when he was taxable in Prince William County in 1800 [PPTL, 1782 – 1810, frame 443].  He was about 85 years old on 22 May 1818 when he made a declaration in Prince William County court to obtain a pension for his services in the Revolution.  He stated that he enlisted in January 1777 in Westmoreland County.  He was called a "free man of colour." aged about ninety-one, on 3 October 1820 when he appeared in court again, declaring that his family residing with him was his wife Mima and son Jack, both slaves [M804-1615, frame 0568].

Winny Mahorney, born about 1759.  Registered in King George County on 5 August 1801: a dark mulatto woman about forty-two years of age is a free woman, she having served in the estate of Richard Bernard, deed, the term of thirty-one years [Register of Free Persons, no. 28].  She was called Winny McHorney in Westmoreland County, head of a household or three "other free" in 1810 [VA: 780].

James Mahorney, born about 1763, registered in King George County in February 1797: a black man, about thirty-four years old, having served his time with William Bernard, Gent., of this County, p. order or certificate of said County of King George | Register of Free Persons 1785 – 1799, no. 7].

Sukey Mahorney, born about 1775, registered in King George County on 5 August 1801: a black woman, aged about twenty-six years.  Is a free woman, she having served William Bernard, Esqr., the term of twenty-one years [Register of Free Persons, no, 30].  She was called Susan Mahorney in Westmoreland County, head of a household of five "other free" in 1810 |VA: 780].

Rachel Mahorney, born about 1780, registered in King George County on 5 August 1801: a black woman, aged about twenty one years,  is a free woman, she having served in the estate of Richard Bernard, deed., the term of twenty one years [Register of Free Persons, no. 29].

Caty Mahorney, born about 1792, registered in King George County on 7 April 1814: a black woman aged about twenty-two years, spare made about five feel four and a quarter Inches high,  was born free of a woman emancipated by Richd. Bernard late of King George County deed.  [Register of Free Persons, no. 46].

Hanna Martyn born about 1703 was the servant of Martha Rust on August 20, 1721 when she confessed to the Westmoreland county court that her child was “begott by a Negro” [Orders 1721 – 31, 7] she may have been an ancestor of Ann born circa 1734.

Elizabeth Morgan, born about 1685, was a white servant of Henry Ashton, Gent., on 25 July 1705 when the Westmoreland County, Virginia court convicted her of having a "mulatto" child [Orders 1698 – 1705, 268].  She was probably the ancestor of:

Anthony Morgan, born about 1705, living in Richmond County, Virginia, in May 1736 when his white servant, James Talent, complained that he was being misused by his master and that his master was a "Mulatto.”  The court ruled that Salient be immediately discharged from his service [Orders 10:3941]

Thomas Morgan, born about 1731, a soldier from Suffolk, Virginia, in the French and Indian War who deserted from the Virginia Regiment in September 1757 and was described as age 26, 5'7",  mulatto [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 31:96].

Edward Mozingo, born about 1664, brought suit against Edward Barrow in Richmond County, Virginia court on 5 April 1705 [Orders 1702 – 4, 3].  His mother-in-law Elizabeth Booth mentioned him and his children Sarah and John in her 27 October 1708 Cople Parish, Westmoreland County will, proved 26 January 1708/9.  She left Edward 500 pounds of tobacco and five head of cattle, and left his daughter Sarah furniture and pewter dishes.  Elizabeth also named her daughter Ann Grimstead, grandchildren William and Thomas Grlmstead, and named son-in-law Thomas Grimstead executor [WB 4:169-70].  On 28 October 1709, Edward appeared in Westmoreland County, Virginia court as the "nearest Friend" of Sara Mazingoe in her suit against Thomas Grinstead, executor of the estate of Elizabeth Booth.  Grinstead was ordered to deliver to Sarah a bed, furniture, and pewter dishes which were willed to her by Elizabeth Booth.  In the same court, Edward and his wife Elizabeth brought a successful suit against Grinstead to deliver to Edward five head of cattle and 500 pounds of tobacco, which was his legacy from Elizabeth Booth [Orders 1705 – 21. 133a].

The Grinstead/Grimstead family descended from Elizabeth Key, a mixed-race slave who sued for her freedom in Northumberland County in 1656 and later married her white attorney William Grimstead [Northumberland County Record Book 1652 – 58, 66, 67, 85a, 85b: 1658 – 66, 27, 43, 44], Edward Mozingo appeared in Richmond County court numerous times between 1721 and 1752 [Orders 9:61, 97, 284. 343, 358, 370; 10:403; 11:29, 294, 379, 395, 403, 442, 457, 542; 12:48, 69, 79, 340].  On 27 March 1734, he and Ephraim McCarty were acquitted in a trial held in Westmoreland County court in which they were charged with breaking open a tobacco house and stealing tobacco, which belonged to Nicholas Minor [Orders 1731 – 9].  His 10 November 1753 Richmond County will was proved by his son Edward on 1 April 1754.  He left his land, tobacco house, and property to his sons Edward, George, and John, and pewter dishes to his daughter Margaret.  He allowed (his son-in-law) George Henson and (daughter) Margaret Henson to lease the land they were then living on for seven years.  He also named his daughter-in-law Hannah and his daughter Sarah Chandler [Wills 1753-671].  Edward and Elizabeth were the parents of:

Edward Mozingo.
George Mozingo.
John Mozingo.

Margaret Mozingo married Francis Chandler in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County on 18 July 1731 [King, Registers of North Farnham Parish, 135].  She was called the wife of Francis Chandler on 26 May 1741 when the Westmoreland County court presented George Hinson of Washington Parish for living in adultery with her and presented Francis Chandler and Rebecca Payn for cohabiting together.  The case against George Hinson was dismissed on 27 February 1741/2 when it was suggested to the court that he had run away [Orders 3739-43, 100, 115a, 134].

Sarah Mozingo married John Chanler in North Farnham Parish on 25 August 1729 (King, Registers of North Farnham Parish, 135].  He was called John Chandler, a "Mulatto," when he was sued in Westmoreland County, Virginia court for a two pound debt on 30 September 1755 J Orders 1755 – 8, 7a].  Most of their descendants were considered white by 1790.  However, three descendants were counted in "A List of Free Mulattoes & Negroes in Westmoreland County" in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:421]:

Thomas Mozingo, taxable in the upper district of Westmoreland County from 1787 to 1810 when his name was crossed off the list [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frames 310, 333, 443, 521, 587, 707], married Mary Cannady, 24 September 1793 Westmoreland County bond.

Richard Mozingo, taxable in the upper district of Westmoreland County from 1789 to 1801 [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frames 341, 426, 484, 501, 532], married Nancy Yardly, 10 May 1796 Westmoreland County bond.

William Mozingo, taxable in the upper district of Westmoreland County from 1790 to 1809 [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frames 353, 388, 426, 532, 686].

Mary Murray, born about 1700, was the servant of Nicholas Minor on 25 March 1719 when the Westmoreland County court presented her for having an illegitimate "Mulatto" child.  The court ordered that she be sold by the churchwardens after she completed her indenture to Minor [Orders 1705 – 21, 367].  She was probably the mother of Ann, born about 1719.

Ann Murray, born about 1719, was a "Mulatto woman" living in Yorktown, York County, on 18 June 1753 when she bound her son Gabriel as an apprentice to John Richardson, carpenter and joiner [Deeds & Bonds 5:5501.  She was indicted in York County for selling liquor without a license on 19 November 1759 and fined 10 pounds currency.  On 21 November 1763, the court presented her for not listing herself as a tithable, and on 16 July 1764, Mary Brown paid her as a witness in the York County suit of James Reade.  On 17 November 1766, the court again presented her for not listing herself as a Tithable [Judgment & Orders 1759 – 63, 90, 126; 1763 – 5, 90, 126, and 248: Orders 1765 – 8, 161, 206].

Mary Oliver, born about 1692, was living in St. Stephen's Parish, Northumberland County, on 18 December 1712 when the grand jury indicted her for having a "Mulatto" child the previous May.  She did not appear in court until 18 November 1713 when she was ordered to pay a fine of 500 pounds of tobacco [Orders 1699 – 1713, 812: 1713 – 19, 6].  She may have been the ancestor of:

William Oliver, head of a Westmoreland County household of 12 "other free" in 1810 [VA: 781].

William Oliver, head of a Lancaster County household of five "other free" in 1810 [VA: 355]

James Oliver, "free negro" head of a Gloucester County household of one "other free" in 1810 [VA: 665].

Benjamin Oliver, "free Negro" taxable in Hanover County in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 29:105].

Ann Palmer, born about 1706, was the servant of Michael Gilbert of Cople Parish, Westmoreland County, Virginia, on 24 My 1724 when she acknowledged having a "Mulatto" child "begott of her body by a negro Man" [Orders 1721 – 31, 70a].  She may have been the ancestor of:

John Palmer, head of a Loudoun County household of five "other free" in 1810 [VA: 393].

Betty Palmer, head of a Queen Ann’s County, Maryland household of two "other free" in 1790.

Samuel Palmer, head of a Kent County, Maryland household of three "other free" in 1800 [MD: 165].

… for the use of Francis Payne Negro towards his freedom, and within a year Payne completed the payments.  He was free by 1651 when he successfully sued Joseph Edlowe of Maryland for a debt of 300 pounds of tobacco for a heifer Edlowe purchased from him, and he had to pay Randall Revell a 4430-pound debt later that same year [DW 1651 – 54, 119, p. 38, fol. 50, p. 69].  He purchased a mare in June 1655 and sold its colt to Anthony Johnson on 31 January 1660 [DW 1655 – 68, fol. 19; 1657 – 66, fol. 74].  His former mistress confirmed his freedom in the July 1656 Northampton County court:

I Mrs Jane Eltonhead...have hereunto sett my hand that ye aforesd Payne (a negro) shall bee discharged from all hinderances of servitude (his child) or any that doth belong to ye sd Payne |DW 1654 – 55 fol. 100].

By September 1656, he had married Amy, a white woman, who he gave a mare by deed of jointure.  Later that year he sued John Gussall for failure to pay him rent [Orders 1665 – 56, 15; DW 1654 – 55, fol. 138; DW 1655 – 68, fol. 19, 21].  In 1665, he and Emmanuel Driggus were security for Hannah Carter when she was manumitted by her master, Francis Pigot [DW 1665 – 68, pt. 2, 15].  He was called "Francis Pane Negro" in the Northampton County tithe lists on which he was taxable on two tithes in 1663 and only one tithes from 1664 to 1668.  He left a 9 May 1673 Northampton County "will, proved 29 September 1763 leaving all his estate to Agnes Pane, stating that Devrox Dregushe (Driggers) was to have nothing [Orders 1657 – 64, 176, 198: 1664 – 74, fol. 14, p. 42, fol. 54, 217, 220-1].  The only evidence that Francis Payne ever had any children was the mention of a child in Jane Eltonhead's 1656 confirmation of his freedom.  However, the following may have been his descendants:

Rebecca Paine, born about 1720, was living in Westmoreland County, Virginia, on 1 April 1741 when the court presented Francis Chandler for cohabiting with her.  He was the husband of Margaret Chandler, a "Mulatto" woman.  Rebecca was called a "Molatto" on 12 May 1746 when she agreed to serve William Bayley for four years to pay a ten pound debt she owed him [Orders 1739 – 43, 100; 1743 – 7, 137].  She may have been the mother of:

Virgin Paine, born about 1745.

Lawrence Paine, born 4 October 1748.

William Paine, born about 1750, a "Mulatto" boy bound to William Hancock, then to Robert Wooding, Gent., who then sold the indenture to Joseph Gill in May 1764.  The Halifax County, Virginia court ordered him returned to Wooding [Pleas 4:266, 279].

Francis Paine, head of a Gloucester County household of five "other free" in 1810 [VA: 666].  He and his unnamed wife were "Mulattoes" living in Gloucester County in 1813.  He was over the age of forty-five in 1815 [PPTL 1800 – 2O].

Evan Paine, born about 1757, a "mulatto" listed among fourteen deserters from Lieutenant John Tankersley's troops.  Tankersley offered a reward for their deliver)' To King George courthouse in the 3 October 1777 issue of the Virginia Gazette [Purdie edition, p. 3, col. 11].

Benjamin Paine, born about 1760, a "yellow" complexioned soldier from Buckingham County listed in (lie size roll of troops who enlisted at Chesterfield Courthouse.  [The Chesterfield Supplement cited by NSDAR, African American Patriots, 152].  He enlisted in Goochland County [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 41].

Joshua Paine, born about 1760, a man of color born in Westmoreland County who was living in King George County when he was listed in a register of soldiers who served in the Revolution [NSDAR, African American Patriots, 1521.  He was head of a Rockingham County, North Carolina household of five "other free" in 1800 [NC: 491].

Sarah Paine, head of an Accomack Parish, Accomack County household of 2 "other free" and three slaves in 1800 [Virginia Genealogist 2:13].

Thomas Paine, head of a Prince William County household of six "other free" in 1810 [VA: 510].

Joanna Paine, "Free Negroe" head of a Fauquier County household of two "other free" in 1810 [YA: 375]

Molly Paine, head of a Queen Ann's County, Maryland household of one "other free" in 1790.

Ben Paine, a "Mulatto" head of a 96 District, Abbeville County.  South Carolina household of one "other free" in 1790 [SC: 57].

Ann Pursley, born about 1715, was living in Cople Parish on 30 June 1736 when the Westmoreland County, Virginia court convicted her of having a "Mulato" child [Orders 1731 – 9, 252a].  She was the ancestor of:

Jeremiah Pursley, an overseer for William Weatherspoon, counted in "A List of Free Mulattoes & Negroes" in Westmoreland County in 1800.

Baker Purse, a gardener for Taker Carter, counted in "A List of Free Mulattoes & Negroes" in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31(1987):42], head of a Westmoreland County household of 1 "other free" in 1810.

James Pursley, a taxable in Bladen County with Gilbert Cox in 1770 [Byrd, Bladen County Tax Lists, 1:34].

Mary Richardson (Richerson), born about 1735, was a "free Negro" woman living in Fredericksburg on 4 October 1757 when she bound herself to Ann Manning for ten years [WB B: 398].  She was living in King George County on 4 March 1762 when die churchwardens of Brunswick Parish were ordered to bind out her "natural daughter" Frank to Ann Mannan [Orders 1751 – 65, pt. 4, 973].  She was the mother of:

Frank Richardson, born about 1761.

Jesse Richardson, head of a Westmoreland County household of 10 "other free" in 1810.

Nancy Richardson, head of a Lancaster County household of seven "other free" in 1810 [VA: 358].

Clary Richardson, head of an Essex County household of three "other free" in 1810 [VA: 202].

Margaret Redley, born about 1692, was presented by the churchwardens of Washington Parish, Westmoreland County, Virginia, on 28 June 1710 for having a bastard child.  She may have been identical to "Margrett a Servt. to Calleb Butler" who was presented by the churchwardens of Washington Parish on 28 May 1707 and 22 February 1710 for "fornication & haveing a Mulatto bastard”.  On 24 June 1713 she and Edward Buss "a Mulatto" were presented by the grand jury for fornication and cohabiting together [Orders 1705 – 21, 58, 66, 136a, 140a, 143a, 145a, 155a, 217].  She was probably the mother of:

Moses Redley, born about 1710, owned land in Orange County, North Carolina, adjoining George Gibson and Thomas Collins [Orange County Loose Papers, vol. V, no. 131; vol.VI, no. 579].  He and his wife Mary were "Mulatto" Orange County taxables in 1755 [N.C. Archives T&C 1, p. 8].  He was called a poor debtor in February 1761 when William Chavis sued him in Orange County court [Haun, Orange County Court Minutes, 1:459].  He was probably related to Moses Ridle, an "Indian" tithable in John Wilson's Pittsylvania County tax list for 1767.

Thomas Sorrell, born about 1758, married Elizabeth Lucas, 3 December 1794 Westmoreland County bond.  He was listed among the "Free Molattoes" living on Thomas Rowaud's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 with his wife Elizabeth and children William and Libby Sorrell [Virginia Genealogist 31:41].  He was a sixty-two-year-old resident of Westmoreland County living with his forty five-year-old wife and eleven-year-old daughter in 1820 when he applied for a Revolutionary War pension [M804-2246, frame 0992], He was probably the father of:

Sukey Sorrell, born about 1770, married Spencer Thomas, "widower.”  11 June 1792 Northumberland County bond.

Fannah Sorrell, born about 1771, married John Evins, 23 November 1792 Northumberland County bond, Thomas Pollard security.

Grace Sorrell, born about 1774, married Augustin Boyd, 24 July 1795 Northumberland County bond, Thomas Pollard security.

William Sorrell, a "free Molatto" living with Thomas Sorrell in 1801.

Libby Sorrell, a "free Molatto" living with Thomas Sorrell in 1801.

William Stewart, "a Colored man, free born" about 1759 in Brunswick County, Virginia, according to his Revolutionary War pension file.  He enlisted in 1777 under Major Hardy Murphy in Northampton County, North Carolina, and marched to West Point and Valley Forge.  After the war, he returned to Northampton County.  He married Mary Artis, 3 January 1792 Greensville County, Virginia bond, 5 January marriage, John Jeter, Sr., surely [Ministers' Returns, 25].  He was taxable in Greensville County in Lucrelia Stewart's household in 1791 and taxable on a horse in his own household from 1793 to 1799 [PPTL 1782 – 1850, frames 129, 164, 181, 193, 206, 220, and 248].  He was head of a Northampton County, North Carolina household of seven "other free'' in 1800 [NC: 479|, perhaps the William Stuart who was witness lo Mary Smart's September 1778 Northampton County will [WB 1:309].  He moved with his family to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he had been living from 1814 until 19 May 1835 when he made his pension application, Nancy Scott, a "Colored woman”, who came to Pennsylvania with the Stewart family, testified on his behalf [M805-773, frame 400].

James Tate, born circa 1660, "a Negro slave to Mr. Patrick Spence”, was married to Hester Tate, an English woman servant of James Westcomb.  Their son James was bound an apprentice to James Wesleomb in Westmoreland County, Virginia, in 1691, and that same year three more of their children were bound apprentices.  Her children were probably the "two mulatto servants" who belonged to the orphans of Patrick Spence.  Jr., in December 1703 [Orders 1690 – 98, 40 – 41; 1698 – 1705, 210a].  James and Hester's children were:

James Tate, born about 1685, bound to James Westcomb in 1691.  On 30 August 1716, John Chilton sued Joseph Moxley, claiming that he was detaining James who he claimed as his servant.  The court ruled that James was a free person [Orders 1705 – 21, 261a].

Jane Tate, born about 1687, bound apprentice to Patrick Spence in 1691.

Elizabeth Tate, born about 1688, bound to Patrick Spence in 1691.  She was presented by the churchwardens of Cople Parish, Westmoreland County, in September 1714 for having a "Mulatto" bastard child.  On 27 April 3 715 her attorney George Eskridge argued that she was not within the purview of the law against having illegitimate children because she was a "Mulatto.”  He posted bond to appeal the case to the general court.  On 30 August 1716, the court ordered that John Chilton, Gentleman, pay her 1,160 pounds of tobacco for attending court for nine days in the suit, which he brought against Joseph Moxley for detaining his servant James Tate [Orders 1705 – 21, 261a, 293].

William Tate, born about 1690, bound to Patrick Spence in 1691.

Their descendants were:

William Tate, born about 1726.
Joyce Tate, born about 1730.
Penelope Tate, born about 1732.
Winnie Tate, born about 1750.
Nancy Tate, born about 1758.

Jesse Tate, born about 1758, a seaman in the Revolution aboard the Dragon from 1777 to 1779 [Jackson, Virginia Negro Soldiers, 44] and head of a Richmond County household of eight "other free" in 1810 [VA: 395].

William Tate, born about 1766.

James Tate married Charity Grimes, 22 August 1804 Westmoreland County bond.  Nathaniel Brewer security.

Peggy Tate, born about 1780.

Peter Tate, born about 1780, a "Molatto" farmer living with (his wife?)  Phillis Tate in Westmoreland County on William Hurt's land in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:45].  Phillis Tate was in a "List of Free Negroes and Mulattoes over the age of 16" in Northumberland County in 1813 [PPTL frame 22].

Jane Tate, head of a Stafford County household of three "other free" in 1810 [VA: 128].

William Tate, born about 1726, was a "Mullatto" boy who still had 17 years to serve when he was listed in the inventory of the Westmoreland County estate of Captain Patrick Spence taken on 10 April 1740 [Estate Settlements Records, Inventories 1723 – 46, 230].  He was taxable in the upper district of Westmoreland County 1783 to 1791: taxable on William Tate, Jr.'s tithe in 1787 and 1789 [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frames 263, 311, 335. 343, 343, 355].  Perhaps his widow was Judy Tate who was taxable on two horses in the upper district of Westmoreland County from 1792 to 1797 [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frames 395, 419, 444, 469].  She was listed as a farmer in Westmoreland County in 1801 with children: Elfried, Molley and Yewell Tate and Mimea Locus.  She married Dick Young, 3 June 1805 Westmoreland County bond, John Watts and Jesse Tate security.  William may have been the father of:

William Tate, born about 1771, taxable in the upper district of Westmoreland County from 1787 to 1798, called William, Jr., in 1790 and 1791 [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frames 395, 419, 469, 485], listed as a "free Mulatto" in 1801 when his place of abode was Louisa County [Virginia Genealogist 31:42].

Elfried Tate.
Molley Tate.
Yewell Tate.

Joice Teet (Joyce Tare), born about 1730, was an "Old woman" in 1801 when she was a "free Molatto" living on William Fitzhugh's land in Westmoreland County, listed next to James Teet [Virginia Genealogist 31:42], She may have been the mother of:

James Tate, born about 1760, taxable on two horses and three cattle in Westmoreland County in 1782 [PPTL, 1782 – 1815, frame 249].  He was a "Molauo" farmer living with (his wife?)  Sarah Teet and children Lovell, Betsey, Mauening, Sary, Laurence, and Lucey Teet on Henry Lee's land in Westmoreland County in 1801.  Perhaps John and Ann Locus, two children living in their household, were his wife's relatives [Virginia Genealogist 31:42].

Samuel Tate, horn about 1779, married Hannah Lucas.  30 December 1809 Westmoreland County bond, Lawrence Ashton security.  Samuel Teet was head of a Westmoreland County household of four "other free" in 1810 [VA: 788].  He registered in Westmoreland County in May 1843: light complexion, 5 feet 6½ inches high, about 64 years of age.  Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1828 – 1849, no. 349].

Joseph Tate, born about 1781, a "free Molatto" farmer living with Felicia Tate and children Sophia and Delphia on William Fitzhugh's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:47).  He was head of a Westmoreland County 8 "other free" in 1810 [VA: 787].  Felicia registered in Westmoreland County in May 1833: a mulatto woman, 5 feet 4-1/2 inches high, 50 years of age, born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1828 – 1849, no. 180].

Ann Tate listed with children Nacy and Willis (?)  Tate in Westmoreland County on William Fitzhugh's land in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:47], head of a Westmoreland County household of four “other free"' in 1810 [VA: 787].  Perhaps Willis (?) was she William Tate who married Pumroy, 1805 Westmoreland County bond.  William Teet was head of a Westmoreland County household of four "other free" in 1810 [VA: 787].

Penelope Tate, born about 1732, brought complaint to the Westmoreland County court against (her master) James Clayton on 29 January 1756.  The suit was dismissed in February 1757 [Orders 1755 – 8, 34, 123a].  She was living in Richmond County on 6 April 1767 when the court ordered the churchwardens of Lunenburg Parish to bind her son Charles to William Dekins.  On 5 June 1786, the parish of Lunenburg allotted 280 pounds of tobacco to (her son?)  Matthew Tait for her support [Orders 1765 – 9, 237; 1784 – 6, 335].  She was the mother of:

Matthew Tate, born about 1760, allowed 280 pounds of tobacco for the support of (his mother?)  Penelope Tait on 5 June 1786.  He was a "free Molatto" farmer living with children; John, Lucy, Rodham, Alcey, and Presley Teet on Lusetly Smith's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:42].

Charles Tate, born about 1765, a "free Molatto" farmer living with (his wife?)  Abby Teet and children James, Betsey, John, and Campbell Teet on John Neat's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:42].

Winnie Tate, born about 1750, was living in Westmoreland County on 26 August 1777 when the court ordered that she appear at the next session to show cause why her daughter Judith should not be bound out [Orders 1776 – 86, 46].  And on 22 February 1785 she was summoned to appear at the next court to show cause why her son Henry should not be bound out.  On 26 March 1793, the court ordered her children Jesse and William bound out but rescinded the order the following day [Orders 1776 – 86, 46, 262; Orders 1790 – 5, 236, 239, 253].  She was the mother of:

Judith Tate, born about 1770, married John Evins, 28 April 1795 Westmoreland County bond, Hugh Quinton, security.  John and Judy Evins and child Rockey Tate were "free Negro" farmers living on William Fitzhugh’s land in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:47].

Henry Tate, born about 1780, married John Johnson, 25 December 1809 Westmoreland County bond, Edmond Tate security

Jesse Tate, born about 1782.

William Tate, born about 1784.

Peggy Tate, born about 1780, was head of a Westmoreland County household of four "other free" in 1810 [VA: 787].  She was the mother of:

Henry Tate, born about 1800, registered in Westmoreland County in September 1821: a Black Boy about 5 feet 6 or 7 inches high about 21 years of age and son of Peggy Teete who was free born [Free Negro Register 1819 – 1826, p. 7].

William Tate, born about 1766, married Ann West, 28 January 1787 Culpeper County bond.  He was taxable in Madison County from 1793 to 1817: taxable on his unnamed son in 1803, taxable on two sons in 1809.  A F.N." listed with unnamed wife and son in 1813 [PPTL, 1793 – 1818].  He was bead of a Madison County household of 14 "oilier free" in 1810 [VA: 409].  He was apparently the father of:

Beverly Tate, born about 1789, taxable in Madison County on John Tate's lithe and 2 horses in 1811 [PPTL, 1793 – 1818].  Registered in the Corporation of Staunton, Virginia, on 14 August 1820: a yellow man (now) aged about 51 years, five feet 7Ύ inches high, who was born free; is registered upon the certificate of Benjamin Cave, Clerk of Madison County Court dated 10 October 1812 [Register of Free Negroes, no. 53].

John Tate, taxable in Madison County in 1811, listed as a "F.N." in 1813 [PPTL, 1793 1818].

Reuben Tate, a "F.N." listed with his unnamed wife in Madison County in 1813 [PPTL, 1793 – 1818].

Coleman Tate, a "Free Negro" taxable in Madison County in 1815 [PPTL, 1793 – 1818],

Nancy Tate, born about 1758, living in Westmoreland County on 26 March 1793 when the court ordered the overseers of the poor in Cople Parish to bind out her children Edmond and Eliza.  The court rescinded its order the following day [Orders 1790 – 5, 236, 239, 253].  She was a "free Negro" farmer on William Edward's land in Westmoreland County in 1801 with children Edmund, Jesive(?), Lewis, Haney, and Simon Tate [Virginia Genealogist 31:44].  Her children were:

Jesive Tate (?).

Lewis Tate, born about 1775, perhaps identical to James Lewis alias Tate who registered in Westmoreland County on 16 May 1835: light complexion, about 60 years old, 5 feet 4-1/2 inches.  Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1828 – 1849, no. 215].

Edmond Tate, born about 1779, married Peggy Aston (Ashton), 12 December 1806 Westmoreland County bond, Joseph Tate security.  He registered in Westmoreland County in October 1828: a black man, five '6" high, about 49 years of age.  Free born [Register of Free Negroes, 1828 – 1849, no. 24].

Haney Tate, listed in Nancy Tate's Westmoreland County household in 1801, perhaps identical to Haraway Tate (born about 1786) who registered in Westmoreland County in April 1846: a Mulatto woman, 5 feet 2-1/2 inches high, about 60 years of age.  Born free [Register of Free Negroes, 1828 – 1849, no. 415].

Simon Tate.

Joshua Thompson, born about 1690, and his wife Sarah bound their daughter Martha to John Sorrell until the age of twenty-one.  On 25 March 1732, Martha petitioned the Westmoreland County court for freedom from John Footman, Gentleman, who then held the indenture.  She testified that she was twenty-one years old on 22 June 1731 and the daughter of Sarah Thompson, a free "Mulatto" who was married to Joshua Thompson by whom she had several children [Orders 1731 – 9, 15].  Joshua and Sarah were the ancestors of:

Martha Thompson, born 22 June 1710, was twenty-one years old on 25 March 1732 when she successfully petitioned the Westmoreland County court for her freedom.  She may have been the mother of:

Thomas Thompson, born about 1731, a "Free Mulatto" who bound himself as an apprentice carpenter and joiner for six years to John Ariss of Cople Parish by Westmoreland County indenture on 31 January J 748/9 [Records & Inventories 1746 – 52, 81].

William Thompson, born about 1735, a "Mailato boy" listed in the 4 June 1751 Westmoreland County inventory of the estate of Thomas Collensworth.

John Thompson, born about 1737, a "Mailato boy" listed in the 4 June 1751 Westmoreland County inventory of the estate of Thomas Collensworth [Records & Inventories 1746 – 52, 156b].

Henry Thompson, born about 1768, married Catherine McGuy, 29 September 1789 Westmoreland County bond, Bennett McGuy security.  Catherine may have been the Kilty Thompson who was a "free Negro" farmer in Westmoreland County in 1801 [Virginia Genealogist 31:46].

John Turner, head of a Westmoreland county household of eight “other free” in 1810 [VA: 59]

Samuel Walker, born about 1152, an eight-year-old "Mulatto Bastard Child" bound out in Frederick County, Virginia, on 3 September 1760 [Orders 1760 – 2, 159].

Thomas Walker, head of a Westmoreland County, Virginia household of eight "oilier free" in 1810.

Elijah Weaver married Elizabeth Frary April 8, 1796 Westmoreland County bond, Tracy Richard Clayton security.

Mary Williams, born say 1685, was the white servant of Willoughby Allerton, Gent, of the Parish of Copely, on 25 April 1705 when she was convicted by the Westmoreland County court of having a "mulatto" child by a "Negro man" [Orders 1698 – 1705, 256a].  She was probably the mother of:

William Williams, born say 1704, was a "free Mulalo" who petitioned the Westmoreland County, Virginia court for his freedom from Isaac Allerton on 31 July 1733.  On 27 March 1753 the court ordered "his several Children" bound out as apprentices.  And on 25 March 1755 he sued John and Spencer Ayris for detaining his children, but the court stood by its original order [Orders 1731 – 9, 99a; 1752 – 5, 60, 227, 249].  He may have been the father of

George Williams, born about 1731, a soldier from Richmond County in the French and Indian War, age 26, a mulatto, 67", when he was listed as a deserter on 2 September 1757 [Magazine of Virginia Genealogy 31:95].

Ann Wilson, born about 1675, an English servant woman, appeared in Westmoreland County, Virginia court on 26 July 1693 and "made confession she was lately delivered of a bastard mulatto child begott on her body by Jack a Negro slave to Youel.”  On 26 May 1697, she petitioned the court for her freedom, but the court ruled that she still had considerable time to serve for having bastard children.  In February 1699/1700, she confessed to having an illegitimate child by a white man [Orders 1690 – 8, 102, 242; 1698 – 1705, 71, 73a].

Sall Young, head of Westmoreland county household of two “other free” in 1810.

Transcription & Compilation © 2006 - 2014, rivahresearch.com

 

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